ALMA spots most distant dusty galaxy hidden in plain sight

ALMA radio image of the dusty star-forming galaxy called MAMBO-9. The galaxy consists of two parts, and it is in the process of merging.

Astronomers using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) have spotted the light of a massive galaxy seen only 970 million years after the Big Bang. This galaxy, called MAMBO-9, is the most distant dusty star-forming galaxy that has ever been observed without the help of a gravitational lens.Dusty star-forming galaxies

Scientists further refine how quickly the universe is expanding

The team’s analysis paves the way for better measurements in the future using telescopes from the Cherenkov Telescope Array.

Wielding state-of-the-art technologies and techniques, a team of Clemson University astrophysicists has added a novel approach to quantifying one of the most fundamental laws of the universe.In a paper published Friday, Nov. 8, in The Astrophysical Journal, Clemson scientists Marco Ajello, Abhishek Desai, Lea Marcotulli and Dieter Hartmann have collaborated

What was the first color in the universe?

This illustration shows the evolution of the Universe, from the Big Bang on the left, to modern times on the right.

The universe bathes in a sea of light, from the blue-white flickering of young stars to the deep red glow of hydrogen clouds. Beyond the colors seen by human eyes, there are flashes of X-rays and gamma rays, powerful bursts of radio, and the faint, ever-present glow of the cosmic

Universe May Be Full of Earth-like Exoplanets

Artist impression of an alien planet. Researchers say Earth-like exoplanets may be common in the universe.

There may be many Earth-like planets scattered around the universe, a study has suggested, raising the possibility that other habitable worlds are out there—and that life may have evolved on it.The first exoplanets—a planet beyond our solar system—were discovered in the 1990s. Since then, thousands have been revealed, with over

Does the Universe Rotate?

Universe

If you look around space, you'll notice a lot of things — the planets, stars, moons, even the galaxy itself — have one thing in common: they're spinning. So, is the universe spinning, too?This mystery is one that cosmologists have been acutely studying, because it's one that can tell us

Making stars when the universe was half its age

The Hubble Ultra Deep Field of galaxies. A new study of the star formation activity in 179 of the galaxies in this image including many dating from about six billion years ago confirms an earlier puzzling result: lower mass galaxies tend to make stars at a rate slightly slower than expected.

The universe is about 13.8 billion years old, and its stars are arguably its most momentous handiwork. Astronomers studying the intricacies of star formation across cosmic time are trying to understand whether stars and the processes that produce them were the same when the universe was younger, about half its

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